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Latest News: 
 
National Women’s Law Center Launches Child Care NOW
 
Child Care NOW is a campaign of child care advocates and allies developed by the National Women's Law Center focused on raising awareness among policymakers and the public about the child care challenges facing America today, including affordability, quality, and provider compensation.  Child Care NOW  provides tools and resources to a diverse group of stakeholders to take action to elevate child care as a national priority. Together with a community of leaders and allies,  Child Care NOW  aims to convince policymakers to make a significant financial investment to expand access to high-quality child care, enabling parents to work and giving children access to the high-quality care they need to succeed.
 
As part of this effort, Child Care NOW has joined forces with ZERO TO THREE’s Think Babies™ campaign and are working together to collect real stories from parents and providers around the country. These true testimonies will help policymakers and the public understand what is working for families and what is not, and we would love your help!  Consider sharing your story and encouraging parents to submit their stories at either NWLC’s or ZERO TO THREE’s site.
 
PennAEYC is a state ally of the National Women's Law Center and supports the new campaign. We encourage you to also Sign-On to Child Care NOW. Together we can raise awareness among policymakers and the public about the child care challenges facing America today, including affordability, quality, and provider compensation.
 

Check out these new resources from around the web:

 

"Getting it Right for our Babies" via the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment and WestEd

 

The State of Preschool 2016 via the National Institute for Early Education Research

 

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in Preschool via the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Penn State

 

A Tale of Two PreK Leaders via New America

 


NAEYC’s Power to the Profession project is promoting a unified and well compensated early childhood workforce through a widely-agreed upon understanding of the name, roles and responsibilities of the profession. Click here to read the initial consensus statement. Please let NAEYC know (by taking this survey) whether this statement reflects where you think ECE should move as a profession.
 
In other NAEYC News:
NAEYC is proud to release new policy agendas focused on how our country can deliver on the promise of high-quality early childhood education with a strong, diverse, and effective early childhood education profession.
       
Join NAEYC in raising a powerful, collective voice to insist that our nation's policies catch up with the science behind the importance of early learning, and the benefits of investing in educators who are qualified, supported, and compensated for the complex and demanding jobs they perform.
 
Read and learn more about NAEYC's vision and priorities, and join America for Early Ed to mobilize and work together as active, engaged, and informed early childhood advocates-because we need each one of you, right now.
 

 
Looking for new resources to share with parents? NAEYC has some great resources on their http://families.naeyc.org website Check it out today!
 

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Fact Sheet: Troubling Pay Gap for Early Childhood Teachers 

Preschool is a critical means of expanding educational equity and opportunity by giving every child a strong start. Studies show that attending high-quality early education can result in children building a solid foundation for achieving the academic, health, and social outcomes that are of benefit to individual families and to the country as a whole.

Children who attend these programs are more likely to do well in school, find good jobs, and succeed in their careers than those who don't. And research has shown that taxpayers receive a high average return on investments in high-quality early childhood education, with savings in areas like improved educational outcomes, increased labor productivity, and a reduction in crime.

Yet, preschool teachers are paid less than mail order clerks, tree trimmers and pest control workers. Child care workers make less than hairdressers and janitors. In fact, most early childhood educators earn so little that they qualify for public benefits, including for the very programs they teach targeting low-income families. 


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