Budget and policy decisions at the federal level have a deep impact at home in Pennsylvania. Improving the early care and education system at the national level will result in improvements in the commonwealth too. Read below for updates and information about our federal policy and advocacy work.

Federal Public Policy

Position Statements on Federal Policies can be found here.

 

The President’s Budget for FFY 2023
President Biden released his budget for FFY 2023 in March 2022. It includes funding increases to core federal early learning and care programs, including the Child Care and Development Block Grant program, Head Start and Early Head Start, and IDEA Part B and C. The White House Fact Sheet can be found here for additional details. Below are key proposed increases:
  • Child Care and Development Block Grant (Discretionary CCDBG)
  • $7,562,000,000 - increase of $1,397,000,000 above FY2022
  • The budget also proposes a new federal administration set-aside of half of a percent to fund salaries and benefits for federal staff to review grantee reports, conduct site visits, coordinate with relevant stakeholders, award grants, and update reporting systems.
  • Head Start and Early Head Start
  • $12,203,000,000 - increase of $1,167,000,000 above FY2022. This includes $650 million directed toward investments in Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships and $505 million in funding for a cost-of-living adjustment.
  • Preschool Development Grant Birth through Five (PDG B-5) - $450,000,000 - increase of $160,000,000 above FY2022
  • IDEA Part B Preschool Grants - $502,620,000 - increase of $93,071,000 above FY2022
  • IDEA Part C Grants for Infants and Families - $932,000,000 - increase of $435,694,000 above FY2022

 

Proposals PennAEYC Supports and is Tracking

The Child Care for Working Families Act

The Child Care for Working Families Act is comprehensive legislation to address the child care crisis and ensure that working families can find and afford high-quality child care. Senator Casey introduced the bill with Senator Murray and Senator Hirono.

The Child Care for Working Families Act would address the current child care crisis in four ways:

  1. Capping costs for working families
  2. Improving the quality and supply of child care for all children
  3. Expanding access to high-quality preschool programs
  4. Supporting higher wages for child care workers

You can find the House Committee on Education and Labor fact sheet here. NAEYC’s Statement on Child Care for Working Families Act can be found here.

 

The Child Care is Infrastructure Act

The Child Care is Infrastructure Act was introduced in the House. The bill authorizes $35 million for student loan repayment for early childhood educators working for providers receiving CCDBG funding and providing up to $3,000 to eligible students pursuing a CDA Credential or an associate's degree. The bill would also reauthorize the Child Care Access Means Parents in School, which funds campus-based child care at higher education institutions. The Act also establishes grant programs for states to address renovations to child care facilities and includes $10 billion to invest in child care infrastructure. PennAEYC and our partners will be following this bill and keep you updated.

 

The Building Child Care for a Better Future Act

The Build Child Care for a Better Future Act allocates mandatory funding to build child care availability over the long term and treat child care as critical infrastructure for families. Senator Casey introduced the bill with Senators Warren (D-Mass.), Wyden (D-Ore.), Brown (D-Ohio) and Smith (D-Minn.). It will increase annual funding for the Child Care Entitlement to States to provide grants to improve child care supply, quality and access in areas of need. A fact sheet can be found here.

 

National Early Care and Education Federal Policy Resources

 

U.S. Health and Human Services